Art Festival Features Dianne Taylor Moore

LITTLETON—The Littleton Area Chamber of Commerce is gearing up for the 47th annual Art Festival titled “Art In The Mountains.” Featured on this year’s promotional poster and call for art advertising are “Perfect Day” and “Franconia Notch,” both colorful pastels by Dianne Taylor Moore.

Downtown Director Jessica Bunker is thrilled to use Moore’s paintings on the Festival’s posters. “The Chamber wants to make these posters a collectors item,” she explained. On selecting Moore’s pieces, Bunker noted, “We needed art work that coincided with our theme and promoted a local artist. Dianne was recommended to us by Jeannette Fournier, another artist who will be at the Art Festival, and Dianne graciously allowed us to use ‘Perfect Day’ and ‘Franconia Notch.’ The former serendipitously depicts a scene here in Littleton, while the latter is a beautiful display of the fall colors we will see during the event’s timing.”

Moore, a Littleton resident, has been painting since she received a stack of cards from around the world, gifted to her by her aunt when she was 12 years old. Picking up a brush, Moore used watercolors to copy the beautiful artwork on these cards.

   
  
 
  
    
  
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    Pastelist Dianne Taylor Moore, working on the pastel, “Mount Washington” in her Littleton studio.

Pastelist Dianne Taylor Moore, working on the pastel, “Mount Washington” in her Littleton studio.

She knew that art school was her destiny, and later enrolled in the Maryland Institute of Art where she studied oil painting.  “The advantage of going to art school is practice,” Moore says. “Artists who skip over art school have to find their signature style while learning the craft while we [art school graduates] have all that practice behind us.”

Moore met her husband, David Taylor, in college after which they relocated to Portland, Maine so she could complete her Bachelor’s. Post graduation, they decided to move closer to Taylor’s hometown of Woodsville, settling in Littleton in the mid-1970s. The downstairs of their beautiful Victorian home was transformed into Taylor’s dental practice, while Moore claimed the exposed beam space above their barn as her studio.

Inspired by the natural beauty of the North Country, Moore’s oil paintings are exaggerated reality, opting for bold lines and colors. A few years after establishing her studio, Moore developed an allergy to oil paints. After traveling to France for a pastel workshop, she fully transitioned to the new medium and has been using pastels ever since. Moore says her work is different than most pastelists, however. “I don’t blend very much,” she explained. “Definitely not the way you’re taught to use pastels.” She also prefers to use sandpaper boards, typically black, as they hold color better.

Moore and her paintings will be at the Littleton Art Festival this September 23-25, featuring prints and originals that include landscapes of Cannon Mountain, Bretton Woods, Burke Mountain, Mt. Washington, and Loon Mountain. A participant- and even a judge once or twice!- since nearly 30 years ago, this is Moore’s first time setting up in a decade. She’s looking forward to this year’s show and says, “If you support an artist, even in a small way, you’re making a difference and encouraging that artist to come back to the area.”

Post cards of the event poster will be available to purchase as a way to commemorate the Art Festival. For more information, visit http://littletonareachambernh.com/art-in-the-mountains/.

To see more of Dianne Taylor Moore’s work, visit www.DianneTaylorMoore.com, or stop by the WREN Local Works Store, Artistic Roots in Plymouth, the Little Village Toy & Book Shop, New England Ski Museum, Northeast Kingdom Artisans Guild in St. Johnsbury, Vt., or even the Coffee Pot on Main Street in Littleton.

As for Moore herself, she’s elated to have her artwork chosen for the event’s promotion, noting, “This  is a way for me to give back.” In between painting on commission or preparing for her next gallery show, Moore can be found ticking items off her “Things To Paint List.”